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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
from the palestinian refugee camp over a year ago. they took a flight to egypt, drove through the sinai, and gazs.d >> there is no safety for my family. death is everywhere. we are palestinians returning to our land and people are welcoming us. >> he was fighting with the free syrian army. we cannot show his face because he still has relatives in syria and he is worried about endangering them. demonstrationsin against the syrian government and they know about me. the regime is after me. i got a prison sentence for 8 years, but i've brought someone in the government. -- i bribed someone. them entered/4 of through an underground tunnel in egypt. they were afraid they would be turned away. he is an electrician, but he cannot find a job. out ofis running savings. he is applying for short-term unemployment assistance. we will give him a chance to work with the ministry of labour. cash for an apartment. >> many say they feel the accepted here. >> in jordan, you live near the border. but here, this is your own land. >> his house in damascus has been destroyed. he says there is nothing to go ba
from l.a. where he is the chairman and a professor at the department of neurosurgery at cedars-sinai medical center. dr. black, welcome to "the war room." >> hello. >> michael: let's start without an easy one for you. what does it actually mean to map the brain? >> it means different things to different people. some people think of an tom call map, mapping out the basic regions of the brain. that has been done in various forms. there's a big effort to try to do it using different types of imaging technique, but as you drill down below that level, you think of molecular mapping, interconnectivity, and how does that interconnectivity invoke normal functions of our personalities as well as disease states such as alzheimer's. >> michael: the number of u.s. residents age 65 and older living with alzheimer would nearly triple in 2010 to 13.8 million by 2050. what kind of time line are we looking at and how likely are we to have a solution by 2050? >> when you think of alzheimer's, it's one in eight people that are 65 and older will have alzheimer's. 50% of people 85 a
said the rockets believed to have been fired from the sinai peninsula in egypt and they hit an open area. egyptian sources denied the accusation. no casualties or damage. a rocket attack in syria has reportedly killed nearly a dozen people in homs. children were among those killed in a village. this footage uploaded on the internet appears to show the bodies of those killed. the village is between homs and the lebanese border. guns fell silent on tuesday in one of the main battlegrounds in aleppo. aid workers drove to the edge of the district to collect 31 bodies that had been rotting in the rubble. some had been lying in the street and between buildings four months. this video is said to show the corpses that have been collected into a schoolyard. australia's national security agency is investigating hundreds of its citizens for allegedly fighting in the conflict in syria. the government is concerned it may pose a security risk to australia. now this reports from sydney at from andrew thomas. >> this person is australian, born and bred. up the australian branch of the three syrian
with intermittent rocket fire from sinai over the years. earlier this month, israel moved a battery with iron dome missile defense system into the city. and you hottest has claimed responsibility for the attack -- agent hottest -- a jihadist rupe has claimed responsibility for the attack -- a jihadist group has claiemed responsibiliy for the attack. >> he denies charges and says the attempt is in the -- says the charges are an attempt by the government to silence dissent. >> outside the courthouse, the lawyer and opposition -- the lawyer says that he faces charges -- [indiscernible] he says the charges are politically motivated. >> sooner or later, we will win and drive these crooks and thieves from power. >> he rose to the head of the opposition movement during russia's elections at the end of 2011. he called for people to vote for any party other than putting's -- putin's. since then, he has said he wants to become president. >> the trial's purpose is to get him off the political stage. it damages his reputation and creates a legal pretext to prevent him from taking part in elections. >> in cou
phone safety. i was a professor at mount sinai. [speaker not understood]. i won the nobel prize with al gore and a group of scientists and i'm here today to tell you as the president of the environmental health trust why i believe that this law that you passed is very important. it has already had a major impact. the law being considered environmental health trust work with the supervisors with harry lehman who just spoke, distinguished attorney, ellie [speaker not understood]. it should send a message to you this is an important public health measure. last week i testified before the d.c. city council on the same issue. you actually have inspired the world. i have met with mayors in helsinki alone and people are taking up the message that people have a right to know about cell phone safety. you've set a very shining example. jackson hole, wyoming, and poem broke, florida passed a law about the right know about cell phones. but it didn't require posting information at the point of sale. your information is widespread. i am releasing to you today a new study that is just today about the
and author of the inner pulse. >> and dr. david samadi chief of robotics at the mt. sinai medical center. good to see you. dr. siegle you were up in boston. we were reporting there together this week. of course, you had that tremendous sense that those bombs that exploded on boylston street and tore at our security in this nation, many remain at the hospital. you visited some of those people and they have incredible stories. >> some of focus is shifting away from the terrorists to the survivors which is
working at mount sinai hospital in chicago, and varies my dad, gives that up, becomes a mom and is dedicated and all of us enormously benefited from that and in particular my youngest brother, a ari who had severe dyslexia. we all have a form of it, i have a mild ability to spell so does rahm but ari has full-blown and could not read. but she was relentless to that role to help them. if she had not been a steer -- stayed home on he probably would not have been able to overcome his dyslexia. but she transmitted all energy, a talent coming into politics, a civil rights movement, and coordinating a lot of activities. that was thwarted when my father decided it was part of his middle-class aspirations for the medical dream to have to have a house in the suburbs so he moves us out of chicago. but my mom's political activities revolve around chicago, a desegregation of schools, neighborhoods, so her entire political activities separate from raising her kids gets thwarted and she has to recreate life in the suburbs. this was 1968. my mother never drove. we got along on public trans
how international jihadist elements have moved from the sinai peninsula into syria. and they -- they comes from different nationalities. we've had terrorist attacks across our border to the south in sinai. they've been saudis, yemenis, and they can move. >> do you have any suspicions at all about foreign links to the bombing in boston? >> i don't know. >> you don't know or can't say? >> i don't know. >> we'll leave it there. ambassador, thank you so much. always a pleasure to talk with you, sir. thanks for coming in today. >> my pleasure. >> up next, we'll continue this conversation with our sunday group. what should the u.s. do about chemical weapons in syria? and what does it mean for iran and the rest of the middle east? we went out and asked people a simple question: how old is the oldest person you've known? we gave people a sticker and had them show us. we learned a lot of us have known someone who's lived well into their 90s. and that's a great thing. but even though we're living longer, one thing that hasn't changed: the official retirement age. ♪ the ques
with the idea it is whether it is wise to get out from the strip that separates from the sinai through which all arms go to home loss. we spent 2004 and 2005 backing sure around in his struggle to get approval from not withdraw from them and chevron -- sharon was convinced the left can wait and the right does not want to. it is only me. if i fail nobody will even try it so we thought he deserved a backings so people who were elected to try to do something. that is why he did not like schroeder of germany he liked sure ron they had a good relationship and he wanted to help him achieve it it is not true they were intimate friends. they were a generation apart and there was a language barrier. there is a phrase about ariel sharon that said he is the only person i ever met that speaks english better than he understands it. [laughter] it was true because actually he had us series of set formulas sediments, gaza, a jerusalem, much beyond that he did not and you would get convoluted sentences the then they would explain in hebrew what he was getting at but chevron -- sharon by the way there was one thi
of the department of urology and chief of robotics at mount sinai medical center. >> good morning. >> jamie: and dr. marc siegel is here as well. from nyu medical center and author of "inner pulse, unlocking the secret code of sickness and health." we are starting with an important topic. autism. it affects so many kids. one in 88. that is an amazing statistic, compared to a new years ago. people now have a much better understanding of it. the centers for disease control estimate a staggering the number i gave you one in 88 have it so including one in 54 boys. apparently boys more at risk. so dr. samadi, what have we learned in the last couple of years? >> we have come a long way. we are doing this topic because april is autumn awareness month. we are starting to think that this autism is
on political. they have armed missiles nested among borders sinai, gaza, southern lebanon and now syria. the only normal is with jordan. so there is a case, you don't have to be a crazy paranoid to say right now i just don't want to anything. i need a challenge for israeli leadership. this is precisely the same when you should test. i don't know whether es possible charlie, i really don't, if you have a palestinian partner for secured peace at least in the west bank. they need an alternative model to the hamas model the muslim brotherhood model that is secularizing ready to work with other religions that shows a different futures that palestinians could say hey in gaza why are we living like that. they seem to be doing okay. is it possible, i don't know, but i don't want to under estimate the threat israel faces but here's the danger. the biggest victim of the arab spring becomes the zionist idea. you have the west bank 2.35 million palestinians with a very high population growth rate and ultimately it leads to a jewish minority in the land of israel. and th would be a tragedy. and tha
medical a-team and the chief of division of robotics at mount sinai hospital is here to weigh in and in full disclosure, this is something i battle with, hypertension, high blood pressure, it's a devastating illness if not treated. >> you're right. high blood pressure is one stop before we get to stroke and heart attack and other things and this is important. now, the c.d.c. this week came up with the news that between 2005 and 2009, the number of high blood pressure has risen by 10%, which is really a striking number. >> kelly: that is striking because there's so much awareness about it now, yet, we see the numbers continuing to go up. even though the awareness has gone up. what's the cause for that? >> we have a huge epidemic, kelly. 30% of the country suffering from blood pressure and many risk factors, many segments about salt intake. the american heart association is taking only 1500 milligrams and we're taking double that, that's one of the major risks for high blood pressure, obesity, lack of exercise, smoking, alcohol. and one of the major secments, you may not taking
in dr. david somati of the medical a-team and chief of division of robotics mount sinai hospital. we have a surgery where we can lose weight and find out it could have disastrous results. >> the tie is very strong and careful about the information out there. let me tell you it is a fact obesity can increase the risk of colon cancer, breast cancer and prostate cancer and those a known fact. if obesity causes cancer, then reducing the weight. it would make sense it would lower the risk of colon cancer. now from a study that's coming out of the swedish and the british, they looked at 77,000 patients and for about 29 years, it's an observational study and it's a good observational study. and if you've gone through some of the gastric bypass, it increases your risk of colon cancer twice, and doubles the risk of your risk. and the theory is bypassing and rerouting your stomach and bypassing the food from the small intestines, you may change the bacteria in the gut and the change of the bacteria in the gut is one of the increases in colon cancer. perhaps there are hormones and enzymes that
why is to get out of the philadelphia strip. and separate gaza from the sinai and the old iranian arms. and in 2004-2005 backing sharon in his difficult political struggle to get approval from the withdrawal from gaza and still does. sharon was convinced that only he could do it. they can't do anything. and if i fail no one will try it. and president bush's view, people who were elected should do something. the goal was not reelection. and john howard on australia and didn't like germany which was just appalling. he liked sharon. they had a good relationship and want to help them achieve this. it is not true they were internet friends. it was a barrier. there was a language barrier. he is the only person i ever met who speaks english better than he understands it. it was really true because actually he had a series of such formulas. talk about gaza or jerusalem, not much beyond that. and very often, particularly convoluted sentences you would lose it. the chief of staff saying in hebrew, he would then walk and explain in hebrew what the president was getting that. sharon, by the way, i
at least two rockets from egypt's sinai peninsula into southern israel, adding to growing security concerns there. they targeted the resort town of eilat. but police officials said there were no casualties. meanwhile, palestinians in the west bank and gaza marked prisoner day, urging israel to release palestinian detainees. they waved flags and carried pictures of some of the 4,500 palestinians in custody. new zealand became the 13th country in the world today -- and the first in the asia- pacific region-- to legalize same sex marriage. lawmakers voted 77 to 44 in favor of the measure. new zealand has had civil unions since 2005, but the new law will allow couples to adopt children and have their marriages recognized by other countries. it takes effect in late august. on wall street, a new sell-off pushed stocks down, amid new signs of economic weakness in europe and lackluster reports from bank of america and apple. the dow jones industrial average lost 138 points to close at 14,618. the nasdaq fell nearly 60 points to close at 3,204. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to
. the united states did help to resolve other aspects of the arab-israeli conflict. notably by the sinai and golan disengagement agreements, the camp david accords, and of course the peace treaty in 199. thissings an important caveat. these were efforts primarily -- they achieved peace, needless to say. but these were efforts primarily directed at diffusing potential superpower conflict and at stabbing american ascendancy in the middle east. some people in this room served in our government and know this maybe better than i do, but the documents are able. we know what drove president nixon and president ford and secretary kissinger and president carter. these are things they were thinking of when they understood hour important peace would be in service of these vital objectives, u.s. diplomacy was forceful and effective. by way of. contrast, -- that's 35 years ago, camp david. by way of contrast there is no peace between israel yes and palestinians, in spite of 35 years of few tile american initiatives -- futile american initiatives, under what i call an orwellian rubric of a peace proce
the robot. he is a excellent surgeon and chief of robotics of the mt. sinai medical center in new york city and great member of the fox news medical a-team. you did four of these yesterday? >> typicallyally i do four to five a day. i also believe you should do the entire surgery. a lot of surgeons run multiple rooms at same time. there are two or three robots and go from room to room. that is when they have a lot of come my -- complications. if you commit to this you have to do the surgery. martha: we have video of you using this technique. the scary thing, the headline, there are situations where the robot grabbed on to tissue and won't let go of the body, the person's body. situations where somebody was whacked in the face by the arm of the robot? that's scary. >> the reason is because, the surgeons are not experienced enough. the big question how do you prepare for this? how do you learn and become proficient to do this? my answer to this if you have a good surgeon, plus the technology, then it results in good outcomes. that is what this is about. if you don't have the experience and you
need reassurance. dr. joanne stone is an obstetrician at mount sinai hospital. >> we have to explain to the patients that medication was taken off the market because of concern about birth defects. but that concern was totally unfounded. pregnant women should feel very comfortable taking this drug. >> i guess you should still try, and the fda does recommend this first, lifestyle changes. >> right. eating smaller meals, maybe avoiding smells in the food that you know are going to upset your stomach. try that first. and then the drug is the final resort. >> i guess some people really have it bad. kate middleton apparently really, really bad. >> had to be hospitalized. >> last resort kind of thing. >> right. >>> coming up, your escape route from a life-threatening situation in a car. >> expert advice you may not have heard before about getting out alive. you are watching "world news now." >> announcer: "world news now" continues after this from our the questions that will be answered right now -- power windows. lisa stark has more on the escape route. >> reporter: what if you had just 3
about. host: would anything in this bill have affected the immigration process for the sinai of brothers -- for the tsarnaev brothers? guest: no. host: your take on that editorial. guest: i think that is largely true. thee 9/11, making immigration system more secure against people trying to harm the united states -- that has been the focus. int might help somewhat identifying people of concern. marginal would make improvements in that. it calls for the completion of the exit part of the entry-exit portion. marginse things at the that would improve security in this bill. i think few americans would understand how it is today from what it was pre-9/11. a lot of the hard work has been done. host: jeff from georgia. caller: good morning. i am a college student. i have been talking to my friends back in tennessee. that of people concerned bo greup i america like the younger suspect did. the older brother lived in america and went to school. americanizedmewhat and have grown up here and have been around other american leave the country for six months at a time. immigrantsk maybe from coury tha
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)